Photo by Paul Everett available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

Photo by Paul Everett available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

Course Descriptions

Term:  

Fall Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
AFAM (F22)40A  AFRICAN AMERICAN ISTAFF
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to important historical, cultural, literary, and political issues concerning African Americans. Through critical readings of literary, historical, and critical texts, this course provides an overview of African American experiences from before the 15th century to today. Beginning with a conceptual overview of slavery as a distinct relation of domination, students will proceed to examine the emergence of modern racial slavery and the retrenchment of racial oppression following the formal abolition of slavery. With special focus on Black feminist, queer, and trans* activism, the course will explore struggles for social transformation and resistance by African Americans in the United States.
AFAM (F22)113  BLACK TV & CHILLMURILLO, J.
What are we watching when we watch Black TV shows? How do we watch Black TV shows? Why do we watch Black TV shows? We must unpack our answers to these questions and sort out the complicated and sometimes contradictory logic undergirding how and how much we pursue, engage, enjoy, and critique Black media. We want to think about why we watch what we watch when we watch it, the practices of watching and engaging with Black TV shows, and what we’re watching in the first place. Our goal in this course will be to interrogate Black TV shows as unique political expressions, theoretical and artistic interventions, and fervent sites of Black discursive life—televisual moments and spaces for enjoyment, discussion, debate, and being together.
AFAM (F22)118  BLK FOOD: HIST, WRIMURILLO, J.
"What that taste like?” Ricardo used to ask. It is a loaded question. Black food tastes like subjection, struggle, and terror; and, joy, necessity, and community; and, at the nexus of all these, and in the most vexed way, care. There are historical, political, and philosophical reasons for that because, as with everything Black folk create, what we make is seasoned by the historical and political contexts we endure, and shaped by the hands, hearts, and minds of we who be Black. This course will ask us to consider not just the physical ingredients of the recipes of Black cuisine in, and sometimes beyond, the US, but also those historical, political, and philosophical ingredients that make Black food Black as it is. You hungry?
AFAM (F22)128  ABOLITIONST WRLDSHARVEY, S.
This course traces the emergence of race and gender as technologies of surveillance within the U.S. context. We focus on the emergence of blackness and its gender formations. Students will examine the institutions of chattel slavery, prisons, capitalism, and the law as key institutions in the development of surveillance regimes.  Further, we will examine the ways that surveillance and imprisonment are productive—that is, in its performance it produces different sorts of binaries including humans/nonhumans, cisgender/transgender people, good workers/surplus laborers, and the ways these subjects respond. Finally, we ask: “What is to be done?”
AFAM (F22)137  AFRICAN DIASPORAMILLER, R.
The concept of Diaspora has played a central role in guiding the identity formations of people of African descent in the Americas, as well as the social, political, and religious movements they constructed from the period of trans-Atlantic slavery to the present. Notions of an African Diaspora have been theorized, articulated, and utilized by Black intellectuals, organizers, and everyday people in a myriad of ways. This class seeks to historicize and examine the idea of an African Diaspora and the movements for Black self-determination it helped to inspire. We will begin by discussing varying theorizations of Diaspora, along with major debates regarding historical, cultural, and political connections between people of African descent around the world and those on the African continent. Subsequent course readings will be organized around several themes including: pan-Africanism, the political economy of the trans-Atlantic and trans-Saharan slave trades, African retentions and transferals, Black religious nationalism, Africans in Asia and the Middle East, Black resistance and Black Power, recent African immigration, and competing notions/meanings of Blackness. All these topics will be examined within a transnational context and with special consideration for the dynamics of class, gender, and national identity.
AFAM (F22)138  IDEA OF AMERICA ICHANDLER, N.
Employing a multidisciplinary approach to the understanding of American society, culture and history, from the 15th century to the early 20th century, this course will provide a new introduction to the very idea and the founding history of America. With touchstone attention to Asia (notably India, Japan, and China) in the idea of America, the diverse sources of its people, African, European, Native American, and more, this course takes the history of matters African American as a central guide. Modern slavery, and then too modern imperialism, modern colonialism, and the coming of the great modern revolutions are central references. The central or guiding question of the course is the doubled matter of the dignity and the denigration of the “human.” The course aims to cultivate a perspective that is at once historical and “cultural,” and thus also comparative, in all of its practices.
AFAM (F22)138  SLAVE REBELLIONSMILLWARD, J.
This course investigates slave resistance, agency, and revolution during key “slave rebellions” in the Atlantic World. The main course objective is to provide students with an overview of classic and more recent scholarship on topics presented in the course. Of particular importance is the relationship between individuals vs. community resistance, and forms of resistance available to slaves based upon their locale, gender, and status in the enslaved community. Students will work to isolate criteria as to what makes a “successful” slave rebellion. We will approach slave resistance and rebellion from a Diasporic perspective.

Students will develop critical and analytical skills by doing oral and written assignments, some of which will be comparative in nature. The reading assignments promise to provide students with a theoretical overview of classic debates in African American history/studies such as class conflict, gendered experiences, and collective action. This class is designed for students who have taken other African American Studies or History courses as well as those who have a general interest in the course material.
AFAM (F22)198  DIRECTED GRP/STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.
AFAM (F22)198  DIRECTED GRP/STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.
AFAM (F22)198  DIRECTED GRP/STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.
AFAM (F22)198  DIRECTED GRP/STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.
AFAM (F22)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.
AFAM (F22)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.
AFAM (F22)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.
AFAM (F22)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYSTAFF
No detailed description available.