Course Descriptions

Term:  

Winter Quarter

Dept Course No and Title Instructor
ART HIS (W23)40B  EUROPE:MEDIEVL &RENMASSEY, L.
40B is a broad introduction to the art and culture of Western Europe from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance. From the catacombs in Rome to the soaring Gothic cathedrals in France, from kings and crusaders to miracle-producing icons and saints’ relics, from exquisite manuscript paintings to humanist painting of the Renaissance, from the nameless artisan to Michelangelo, this class will cover some of the marvelous, monumental and meaningful works of art and architecture produced in Europe from ca. 100 to 1500 CE. Along the way, we will learn about: the emergence of the Christian church as a major cultural and social, as well as economic force; the controversies in the early Christian church over the nature and value of images; the worship of images and relics of saints and the Virgin; the construction of both sacred and royal space; the idea of the artist as a unique type of individual/genius; representations of otherness as experienced through colonialism in what is now South and North America, China, the West Indies, i.e., the agency of black figures in Western Art, the representation of Indigenous peoples, the acquisition of rarities and exotica as cultural appropriation and knowledge acquisition.
ART HIS (W23)42B  ARTS OF CHINAWUE, R.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)110  MEDIEVAL ENCOUNTERSSHARTRAND, E
The Mediterranean Sea has long been a locus of artistic, cultural, and religious exchange. Trade routes criss crossed the waters, connecting seemingly distant kingdoms and empires. Gifts were given between rulers and wars were fought for territory. People speaking different languages and practicing different religions frequently interacted. This course will investigate the artworks produced by such encounters in the Mediterranean region throughout the Late Antique and Medieval periods.
ART HIS (W23)121  GENDER &RENAISSANCEMASSEY, L.
Artistic practice in the Italian Renaissance was inextricably tied to considerations of sexuality and gender.  For instance, Leonardo da Vinci equated the beauty of painting with the artist's ability to represent the beauty of women. Alternately, sculptors like Donatello and Michelangelo produced works that exploited the homoerotic potential of the male nude form, celebrating it as the epitome of ideal beauty. In terms of religion, theological debates regarding Christ's humanity involved speculations about his sexuality. Altarpieces and other artworks that lavished attention on Christ's body and genitals contributed to these debates in substantial ways. On the other hand, while women artists (and there were many in the Renaissance and Baroque periods) were often represented as insufficiently masculine to achieve artistic mastery, male artists were often represented in feminized, gendered terms as "giving birth" to artistic ideas and form.  In this course we will explore these and other contradictions and the various ways that gender and sex informed the production and consumption of art in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries.
ART HIS (W23)140A  GLOBAL CONT ARTVOLZ, S.
This course examines the emergence of contemporary art as a transnational category tied to political and economic dynamics during the late 20th and early 21st centuries. It considers the structural forces and processes shaping dominant modes of art production, circulation, and display on the world stage including the market, the biennial system, the contemporary art museum, and more. Addressing the increased influence of these structures on cultural activity, the course surveys interventions into the institutional parameters of contemporary art by practitioners in diverse contexts, looking at their relations to place, history, and identity. Among other topics, students will learn about ideas and debates regarding institutional critique, site specificity, relational practice, digital art, and installation.
ART HIS (W23)145B  MODERN ARCHITECTUREDIMENDBERG, E.
This course will introduce principal developments in architecture and urbanism since the end of Second World War.  It will focus upon the vicissitudes and global diffusion of western modernism, the development of the metropolis and megalopolis, the emergence of postmodernist and critical regionalist traditions, the quest for sustainability, and the imbrication of the built environment in the political, social, and cultural changes accompanying the coldwar, the civil rights and anti-war movements, the counterculture, and decolonization.  Architects and urbanists to be studied include Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Kahn, Walter Gropius, Oscar Niemeyer, Robert Venturi, Denise Scott-Brown, Gunther Behnisch, Alvar Aalto, Alison and Peter Smithson, Archigram, Superstudio, Frei Otto, Alvaro Siza, Gunnar Asplund, Jorn Utzon, Frank Gehry, Carlo Scarpa, Buckminster Fuller, Clorindo Testa, Lina Bo Bardi, Charles and Ray Eames, Richard Rogers, Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, Aldo Van Eyck, Peter Eisenman, Bruce Goff, Paul Rudolph, Norman Foster, Tadao Ando, Charles Correa, Arthur Erickson, Paolo Solieri, Constant, Robert Moses, Jean Nouvel, James Stirling, Charles Moore, Kenzo Tange, Steven Holl, Herzog and de Meuron, Peter Zumthor, Arata Isozaki, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Enrique Norton. Assignment structure: Take-home midterm and final research paper.  Instructor: Edward Dimendberg.
ART HIS (W23)151C  MODERN CHINAWUE, R.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)155A  ANCIENT INDIAPATEL, A.
This course will examine the visual history of the region defined as ‘India’ today, but necessarily encompassing parts of modern Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and eastern Afghanistan. After an introduction to the Indus Valley Civilization (2700-1500 BCE), we will explore the legacies of Alexander the Great's campaigns to the edges of India and their impact on the Buddhist art and architecture of Bactria (now Afghanistan), Gandhara (now Pakistan) and the Indian subcontinent. We will also examine the inverse dispersal of Buddhist and Hindu iconographies both eastward and westward in Asia. The course will culminate with the supposed Golden Age of the Gupta empire and its far-reaching legacies from Iran to China. No prerequisite.
ART HIS (W23)190W  ART HISTORY METHODSJUNG, G.
This seminar introduces major approaches and methodologies in the study of art and design history. Through various critical frameworks, students will learn not only to analyze and research visual works of art but also to read and challenge theoretical texts. These tools will help students to develop their own perspectives and write and reflect on their approaches to visual and textual materials. This is a writing-intensive course.
ART HIS (W23)198  GLOBAL BOOK ARTSHARTRAND, E
Manuscripts, or hand written and illustrated books, are not only products of the Medieval west. Book art in many forms can be found all over the world. This course will thoroughly investigate manuscripts in all contexts from Japanese hand scrolls, Mayan codex vessels, Ethiopian Gospels, Persian epics, French Books of Hours, and beyond. It will take into consideration everything from the material process of book making to the function of various book types within their culture. The class will additionally visit local manuscript collections such as the Getty and hear from experts in the field.
ART HIS (W23)198  COLONIAL PHOTOGRPHYPATEL, A.
This seminar considers photography as both technology and cultural production, and examines its intervention in the creation and perpetuation of empires, archives and knowledges across Eurasia with a focus on British and Russian imperialisms. Practically from the moment of its emergence in northern Europe in 1839-40, photography was also practiced in the Indian subcontinent and elsewhere by European and local photographers. We will examine the proliferation of photography in various colonial and local ambits, as well as fields such as geographical documentation, archaeological survey, and the new "science" of anthropology. Ultimately, the course will asses the effects of photography not only on various art forms, but also on the very perceptions of the world during the 19th century.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYBETANCOURT, R.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYCANEPA, M.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYCOOKS, B.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYJUNG, G.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYLAPIN DARDASHT, A.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYMASSEY, L.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYNISBET, J.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYPATEL, A.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYWUE, R.
No detailed description available.
ART HIS (W23)199  INDEPENDENT STUDYVOLZ, S.
No detailed description available.

For the most up-to-date information, check the Schedule of Classes.